Coding for Hunger: Data Geeks to the Rescue

Originally posted at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/maura-o/social-media-world-hunger_b_2411454.html?utm_hp_ref=technology

Local farmers make short videos giving specific advice on many topics, with viewers rating videos just as we push 'Like' on Facebook. Farmers now watch nearly 2,500 relevant videos -- which average 11,000 viewers per video -- on their cellphones. Talk about a social diffusion network! ”

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One billion people suffer from chronic hunger and face terrible choices daily. A billion is a hard number to grasp, but imagine if every man, woman and child in the largest cities in the U.S. — including Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, Houston, Seattle and Atlanta — would never get enough to eat or have a chance to thrive.

Technology and business have recently brought dramatic global improvements in areas like health and agricultural productivity. Through social media, we can harness crowd-sourced wisdom and rapid diffusion networks to imagine a day in our lifetime where families everywhere can take pride in the accomplishments of their healthy children.

What are we seeing in this tech cauldron that’s knocking our socks off? Kat Townsend, a Special Assistant for Engagement at USAID, worked with The Chicago Council to choose six examples using big data, videos and randomized control trials to reduce hunger. USAID showcased these examples at a Council event on food security at the G8 to demonstrate how low-cost technologies can accelerate and scale food security.

I’m especially excited about Digital Green, founded by young Indian entrepreneur Rikin Gandhi. Digital Green enables local farmers make short videos giving specific advice on many topics, with viewers rating videos just as we push ‘Like’ on Facebook. Farmers now watch nearly 2,500 relevant videos — which average 11,000 viewers per video — on their cellphones. Talk about a social diffusion network!

In September, USAID together with Nathaniel Manning — a White House Presidential Innovation Fellow from technology superstar Ushahidi — ran a weekend Hackathon for Hunger. Global teams of brilliant data geeks pounded out code on big data sets to solve hunger challenges. Palantir used data compiled by the Grameen Foundation on crop blights, soil, and farmer feedback to generate a real-time heat map that helps farmers identify where crop infestations are happening. Farmers also receive warning messages about looming crop diseases and where they may strike, giving farmers the chance to harvest early. PinApple’s website helps farmers can input their location for suggestions on the best crops to plant-based on elevation, soil PH, and annual rainfall.

We can’t solve food security by the mere push of a button from a programmer in Maputo or a policymaker in Bangladesh. What technology can do is bring information and tools to farmers, processors and consumers in remote corners of the world. Data point by data point, we’re reaching those who need it most… one video and SMS at a time.

Tell us what other technologies or social media techniques you’re seeing that could defeat hunger. Disagree if you have your reasons. We all have much to learn from one another.

Leave your thoughts here or continue the conversation on Twitter. Join me @MauraAtUSAID and follow Bertini and Glickman @GlobalAgDev; USAID @usaid; USAID’s Feed the Future Initiative @FeedtheFuture; Ushahidi @Ushahidi; Project Open Data @ProjectOpenData; Palantir Technologies @palatir; PinApple @PinApple, Kat Townsend @DiploKat; and Nat Manning @NatManning.


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